LEGO’s recent successes come from partnering with the right people

4 min read
3

LEGO (3)

If you had to ask your parents for advice when it comes for saving for the future, they’d probably tell you to pay a portion of your earnings every month into a pension account. That’s solid, but boring, advice. I’ve got a better idea: LEGO. Over the last couple of years, LEGO sets have exploded in popularity and resulted in a marketplace where many a sought-after collection of the Danish blocks can fetch a high sum when the right collector comes along.

Back in the 2000s, this would have been unheard of as the LEGO company was losing money hand over fist. Failed ventures contributed to their decline as LEGO just couldn’t manage to stay relevant. The story is completely different today however, as LEGO’s annual output of over 75 billion bricks resulted in ludicrous profits. Like over a billion dollars in the US alone back in 2015. That’s not too shabby.

So how did a company that was $800 million in debt survive to become the most powerful brand in the world? By checking in with its fanbase and realising that it didn’t need to make obscene profits at first, that’s how. “Lego has this incredible ability to engage with people and that has single-handedly enabled it to weather very, very difficult seas,” brand analytics firm Interbrand’s  Simon Cotterrell explained to The Guardian.

Read  Hot Toys Flash is the fastest figure alive

LEGO (1)

We might not make as much money if we outsource it, but the product will be better

What’s made them successful over the past 10 years is their ability to create new entities, movies, TV shows, by partnering with brilliant people. They’ve said: ‘We might not make as much money if we outsource it, but the product will be better.’ That mentality is very Danish. It comes from saying: ‘We’re engineers. We know what we’re good at. Let’s stick to our knitting.’ That’s a very brave thing to do and it’s where a lot of companies go wrong. They don’t understand that sometimes it’s better to let go than to hang on.

That eye for partnering up with the right people resulted in the wildly popular Ninjago series that your kids probably keep badgering you for, as well as plenty of other LEGO-related merchandise. Heck, even I have a small army of the mini-figures from various franchises sitting on my shelf. My LEGO Batman in his evening gown is my favourite.

The rest of the interview is well worth a read, but it’s safe to say that thanks to recent successes in the video game space with LEGO Dimensions and big screen films which pulled in rave reviews, LEGO’s future is more secure than two one-row six-stud bricks pushed together. I chose the wrong day to cut my fingernails.

Read  DC is reimagining Batman, Wonder Woman and Superman for the wholesome Milk Wars

Last Updated: June 6, 2017

Darryn Bonthuys

Something wrong gentlemen? You come here prepared to read the words of a madman, and instead found a lunatic obsessed with comics, Batman and Raul Julia’s M Bison performance in the 1994 Street Fighter movie? Fine! Keep your bio! In fact, now might be a good time to pray to it!

  • glad to hear it!

    • miaau

      Well, yeah. This is Lego.

      ONLY childhood toy I and I think many others still have AND it all still works. (some been liberated by fingerlinging cousins, dammit). My children will play with my, admittedly mostly space themed, Lego.

      I cannot wait…… We can build together.

  • miaau

    Lego Star Wars series. So Silly, even an adult can watch it.

    Yoda and then the droids with the younglings. Ok, they can make the droid section shorter

Check Also

No Ranger is safe in 2018’s Power Rangers: Shattered Grid event

Lord Drakkon is staging a counterattack across all of Ranger time and space in 2018’s Shat…