Super Smash Bros. Brawl – Reviewed – Wii

3 min read
1

By Philip Dunkley 

Super Smash Bros Brawl

Every so often a game comes along that simply blows the player away with its depth and playability. This year I have put out some of the biggest scores in my life on certain games, and at first I thought that I may be pushing the scores a bit high, but I then realized that it might just be the fact that so many good titles have come out, and that developers are getting better and better at getting games out for the Consoles. This brings me to this review, a Nintendo title that I have had zero interaction with over the last few years, and have not got into the series even a little bit.

I found myself rather nervous about reviewing this title, as I know so much has been spoken and written about it, and when Nintendo invited us to the launch, I was nowhere near as excited as I should have been.

Super Smash Bros. Brawl is a fighter through and through, with seriously cool multiplayer focus, and a single player mode that will put any other fighter to shame out there. It’s based around local and online multiplayer, with modes galore that can make every experience truly unique.

It goes like this, take a whole bunch of Nintendo characters, from various different games throughout it’s history, and put them together in one game. All those arguments around which Ninty character is better, just got solved.

Super Smash Bros Brawl

You have a choice of 35 characters, some of them unlockable, and they range from Mario to Princess Peach, Zelda to Kirby and Pokémon to Pit. Throw in a couple of none proprietary characters like Solid Snake and Sonic, and you have a cast of characters that are instantly recognizable.

There isn’t a real story around it, due to the nature of the game, but the single player mode does offer a bit of depth with all characters in the game coming together to fight against an unknown evil.

From a control point of view, this game plays so damn well, it’s actually unbelievable. You have two attack buttons, but combining them with a different direction, unleashing all kinds of crazy moves. You are also assisted by numerous power ups in the levels, which add new attacks, give you new weapons or simply bolster your health. You will also be glad to know that this title supports all possible Wii controller options, including the Wii-Mote and Nunchuck, Classic Controller, Wii-Mote alone or the GameCube controller. It’s simple, yet remarkably deep, and will keep you busy for hours.

It just plays so well, with the action never really being interrupted, except by a few loading screens here and there, and the moment you bring a few friends into the mix, well it suddenly cements itself as the ultimate party fighting game.

Super Smash Bros Brawl

From a graphics point of view, this is another great looking title from Nintendo, and how the other developers have not cottoned on to Nintendo’s secret is beyond me. The frame rate never dips, and it just look so damn good, that you can almost believe that someone has been lying to us about the Wii’s power.

The sounds are fantastic as well, with an orchestral score that conjures up emotion from every angle, sets the mood really well. Once again you will hear no dialogue in this title, a Nintendo trademark that I see staying around forever.

Overall, this game is fabulous, it plays well, looks good and sounds great, and it amazes me to see how many quality titles Nintendo can push to market, especially with so many titles coming from them. I really think I need to be taken to Nintendo to have a look at these guys at work (Nudge Nudge, Wink Wink). If you like fighters buy it now, if you don’t, buy it anyway, it’s worth every cent.

Scoring:
Gameplay: 10/10 [Plays like a dream] Presentation: 9/10 [Looks great] Sound: 9/10 [Very atmospheric] Value: 10/10 [I think I might be hooked] Overall: 9.5/10 [A Masterpiece]

Last Updated: August 21, 2008

Check Also

Former Facebook VP says social media is ripping society apart

“I think we have created tools that are ripping apart the social fabric of how society wor…