Assassin’s Creed III Remastered is more than just a visual upgrade

2 min read
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Creed

It’s been seven years since Assassin’s Creed III first saw the light of day, and I still absolutely abhor that game. I hate how its main twist was that it took you out of the shoes of a generally interesting character and decided to make you spend the rest of the game as a thoroughly unlikable stick in the mud who had the entire White River national forest lodged up his backside.

I hate that it threw a stack of ideas at you without ever stopping to make any of them actually feel fun. I hate that damn final level of Assassin’s Creed III, which is the textbook example of how not to construct a climax. That being said, Assassin’s Creed III’s missteps were vital for the growth of the franchise, and I’d hate to see how Black Flag, Unity or the recently released Odyssey would have fared without that lingering shadow hanging over them.

There’s still some life in the bones of Assassin’s Creed III, as Ubisoft wants to give the polarising sequel a second chance over on the Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and Nintendo Switch. Knowing full well that they couldn’t just take the original game, slap on some new textures and call it a day, Ubisoft has decided to try and spruce up Assassin’s Creed 3 with some quality of life upgrades.

In a new video detailing those tweaks to the gameplay, Ubisoft revealed how some of the more shoddy design has been fixed up. Players can now aim arrows in free-aim as opposed to the lock-on targeting that never freakin’ worked properly in 2012, stealth has been upgraded to give you more options and the mini-map has been given a facelift.

Numerous fixes like this are just part of the package, which has a bunch of other cosmetic nip tucks as well when it releases on March 29. Will they succeed in making Assassin’s Creed III a better game? No idea, but at least I’ll be whinging about a game that looks a touch prettier than the original.

Last Updated: March 14, 2019

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