David Jaffe hopes Twisted Metal avoids having an online pass

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Earlier this year Sony started utilising online passes for its multiplayer games. David’s Jaffe’s new Twisted Metal  for the PS3 is heavily multiplayer focused, and as such will more than likely be implemented in his game.

That doesn’t mean he wants it there, though. We’ve had a run in with the outspoken Jaffe before, but we love the guy, not least because most of the time when he speaks, he makes damned sense.

“I know that we have been asked to look into some code work for it but I don’t believe that a decision has been made at this point.” Jaffe said to Eurogamer on the implementation of an online pass. “Or if it has been made it has not been shared with me yet.”

Jaffe believes that not having an online pass would help build up the multiplayer focused game’s fanbase.

“I’d actually prefer that we don’t do it, even though it’s probably good business, only because we have such a mountain to climb in terms of gaining people’s good faith, especially in Europe, and really letting people know that this is a title that’s worth getting excited about.”

“I’m okay with the fact that we might lose sales on this first game if, because of it, we generate a lot of fans that otherwise wouldn’t have played the game. The online is so much the bread and butter of this game, so I’m okay with it because it means we’re setting ourselves up for a possible return to the franchise one day.”

Having said that, Jaffe realises it’s up the suits at Sony to decide whether or not Twisted Metal will be encumbered with an online pass.

“It’s not my call and I’d totally understand if Sony as a company said ‘Look, this is a mandate that permeates all of our titles. We’re not making selective choices’,” Jaffe said. “Those are decisions that I’m no longer privy to as I don’t work for Sony any more.”

Last Updated: December 8, 2011

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Geoffrey Tim

Editor. I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces.

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