Kingdoms of Amalur: The Reckoning trades Classes for Destiny

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I love RPGs – but one of the problems with them is when you create your character, you’re forced to choose a largely binding class long before you know how the game plays. It’s something that’s been changing a bit recently, with developers seemingly keen to remove the confining restrictions of a set class. Skyrim allows you to level up based on your play style – and Dark Souls, though making you select a class, allows you to level up your character in whatever manner you choose.

Kingdoms of Amalur: The Reckoning will also allow players  to make character choices as they play.

“The Destiny system came from a rejection of a very common convention in RPGs,” Will Miller, system designer at Big Huge Games, said in a developer diary. We pick our class at the beginning of the game. You’re basing that decision on information you don’t have. You’re not sure how a rogue is going to play – even if you’re a seasoned RPG veteran, you’re not sure how this class is gonna play through the long play of the game.”

“You pick abilities from three different ability trees – might, finesse and sorcery – and based on the distribution of your abilities in these trees, we unlock for you new destinies that you can apply to yourself,” Miller continued. Those destinies are effectively a class. They come with buffs, they come with special abilities.”

Now that Skyrim’s out, this is the next RPG in my sights. I have to wonder why there isn’t quite nearly as much hype for this game as there should be, considering its pedigree. Ken Rolston, designer of Morrowind and Oblivion serves as the game’s executive designer; R.A Salvatore, the writer who penned the Icewind Dale trilogy and the DemonWars Saga is creating the universe and lore, with Spawn creator Todd McFarlane creating its characters.

Kingdoms of Amalur hits PC, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 in February next year. Hopefully I’ll be done with Skyrim by then.

Last Updated: November 14, 2011

Geoffrey Tim

Editor. I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces.

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