Sana’s $400 sleep goggles promise to put an end to insomnia

2 min read


Most adults don’t get enough sleep. There could be many reasons for that – including our stress-laden lifestyles, video games, parties and Netflix binges. When a lack of sleep comes from a personal choice that’s fine, but many people are unable to sleep, or take forever to sink into slumber.

This new set of goggles from Sana Health promises to put an end to insomnia, for those who have $400 to spare, that is. This chunky device is more than just a typical sleep mask though. While it does block light, it also emits pulses of light and audio to help you drift into dreamland.

The audio-visual combination apparently triggers patterns in the brain that are just like the ones you’d experience in the best, most restful stages of sleep. According to Sana Health, once you’ve trained the goggles to work with your brain, it’ll knock you out within 10 minutes. Importantly, they apparently help users sleep through the night. The goggles also measure things like pulse, breathing and other indicators, and can tailor the output to the user’s biometrics.

“It uses audio-visual stimulation to trigger specific patterns in the brain. In the same way that when you go into a nightclub, and hear fast music and see strobed lights, this produces an excited state in your brain, this device produces the patterns your brain needs in order to produce deep states of relaxation,” says Sana Health founder and CEO Richard Hanbury.

Hanbury began working on the goggles as a way to combat his own chronic pain and sleep-related troubles. The company has secured $1.3 million round of seed funding from Founders Fund, Maveron and SOSV and others, with the goggles set to cost $400.

While it’s easy to balk at that sort cost, for those with chronic insomnia, it’d be more than worth it. As somebody who suffered chronic and debilitating insomnia for years, you can’t put a price on good sleep.

Last Updated: May 29, 2017

Geoffrey Tim

Editor. I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces.

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