Watch over a century of stop motion in three minutes

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harryhausen

I tell you what, we have this Computer Generated Imagery (CG) thing pretty nailed down. It’s not just that action extravaganzas now look as real as they could be, but we are even using CG to create the mundane.

Things have certainly moved on since the sanitized scenes of the second Star Wars trilogy: the throwback decor of The Great Gatsby is nearly impossible to distinguish from the real thing, Planet of the Apes has me believing there are talking primates and The Jungle Book – essentially a kid in a green room – looks so real the main character almost feels like the CG prop.

jungle-book

But long before computer graphics could step in, stop motion was the main way to create mind-blowing experiences on movie screens. Today the art has become a bit of a niche: so much so that Box Trolls was accused of looking too CG, even though it was almost entirely hand-animated. Most recently Kubo and the Two Strings held the flag for stop motion animation, but audiences might be too spoiled and Leika, the studio, recorded yet another failure. Meanwhile movies that recycle the same joke over and over make a king’s ransom.

So while we lament the world’s fading love affair with stop motion, here is a chance to experience the art’s evolution. Vugar Efendi has made a supercut from over 30 movies – starting way back in 1900 – to show how far we’ve come. From J. Stuart Blackton to Benjamin Christensen to Ray Harryhausen to Phil Tippett to Henry Selick and Leika…

Last Updated: September 20, 2016

James

A total movie glutton, nothing is too bad or too obscure to watch, unless it's something like The Human Centipede. If you enjoyed that, there is something wrong with you. But bless you anyway - even video nasties need love...

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