Fallout Shelter is raking in more money than Candy Crush Saga right now

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FalloutShleter

Fallout Shelter, the terribly addictive, free-to-play game that Bethesda surprise-released last week is pretty amazing. It’s a grindy chore, sure, but it’s addictive as hell, and is doing its job in getting people excited for more Fallout. Though it’s free-to-play, it doesn’t place any of the usual microtransactional limits on gamers. Instead, you can purchase items if you like, but there’s no monetary barrier to entry. That’s amazing. More amazing? Right now, it’s making more money than Candy Crush Saga.

King’s addictive match 3 game is reported to make about US$2.5 million a day in microtransactions, because people are willing to pay a ton of money for stuff that’s supposed to be free. But for now, Fallout Shhelter has knocked the jelly-bean game out of its number 3 spot on the top-grossing charts on Apple’s service.

The game was released at the tail end of Bethesda’s inaugural press conference at E3 this past Sunday, and really is a testament to the purchasing power of the sort of people you’d call “core gamers.” While Fallout Shelter isn’t exactly a game made for that demographic, its unveiling at an E3 event and its rapid rise in popularity is certainly an indicator of how a core gaming audience is ready to spend money.

“We’re very pleased. Fallout Shelter is doing amazingly well, with no real buildup,” said Pete Hines, vice president of PR and marketing at Bethesda Softworks, said to VentureBeat. “To take such a light approach to monetization compared to other free-to-play games — we felt like we wanted to err on the side of caution and make it very unobtrusive, make sure it was fun first and foremost. So far so good.”

Have you downloaded it? Are you as addicted as the rest of us? Have you paid for any of those lunch boxes?

Last Updated: June 18, 2015

Geoffrey Tim

Editor. I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces.

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