Microsoft reveal Windows 10

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It’s like everyone has forgotten how counting works. First Nvidia jump from their 700-series straight into the 900-series, and now Microsoft has done the same thing. Yesterday, the software giant formally revealed Windows 10, curiously skipping out on the 9 everyone was expecting.

The good news is that all the features that were rumoured for Windows 9 are front and centre in 10. Microsoft is really pushing for a platform that will seamless connect all their device tiers together, in the same way Apple has done it with all of their products. So tiles are still here, but they’re far less intrusive this time.

As everyone expected, Windows 10 will see the proper return of the Start Button. A feature that was left out of Windows 8 and semi-patched in with 8.1, the Start button now functions as it should, albeit with a little extra tile loving. Live Tiles will take up space on the right of the Start menu, and the search bar function will sort through both installed programs and tile apps. It’s a more elegant solution than Windows 8 ever had, and probably the best part of Windows 10.

Tech-Preview_Start-menu-720x404

Apps themselves have also been given a much needed touch up. Apps can now have their windows resized and minimized, unlike the forced full screen operation in Windows 8. This also comes in handy with the better snap functionality, which allows apps to be snapped just like any other program window. no more messing around with what seemed like two desktops.

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A new Task View will also make moving between multiple displays a lot easier. It looks a lot like a command centre that connects all of the different desktops together, allowing you to easily bring up apps on one screen despite being active on another. Less ground work for your mouse, in real terms.

Microsoft delved more into enterprise features with the reveal last night, so consumer features will probably come in thick and fast early next year. The OS is only set to launch later next year, so this is just the tip of the iceberg. So far though, it’s looking like a marked improvement over Windows 8’s UI, which was really the only thing wrong with that operating system.

Last Updated: October 1, 2014

Alessandro Barbosa

You can all call me Sandy until I figure out how to edit this thing, which is probably never. Sandy not good enough? Call me xXx_J0k3R_360degreeN0Sc0pe_xXx. Also, Geoff's a bastard.

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