No joke: Nintendo announces the 2DS

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2ds (2)

If there’s one handheld console that has really defined this generation, it’s been the Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo has sold millions of these beauties in regular and extra-large variants since it launched. And now a new iteration of that hardware is on the way. I’ve got my serious face on for this, so that you know that I’m not joking. Say hello to the 3Dless 3DS, the Nintendo 2DS.

Out in October, the 2DS is capable of playing all 3DS games, but in groundbreaking two dimensions only. It’s shaped like a slice of cheese, and good luck carrying it around in your pocket unless you’re trying to bring Hammer time pants back into fashion.

2ds (1)

Unlike the last eight years of Nintendo handheld consoles, the 2DS is incapable of closing in on itself, tossing away a clam shell design in order to be one single piece of tech. That could also be due to the fact that the 2DS happens to be one big screen underneath that plastic, as opposed to two.

All the 3DS hardware is still there, from wi-fi to touch screen controls, but hot damn this thing is ugly. Nintendo is looking to market this as an entry-level device for their handheld segment, a cheaper version of the 3DS which will cost around $129.99. Here’s the full list of specs, that details the differences between the two. Click to embiggen:

specs

I get where Nintendo is coming from with this console idea. It’s designed for a younger demographic and more cash-strapped parents, but jeez, it is ugly. And by turning off the 3D on my 3DS, I’ve already had a 2DS before it was mainstream.

Last Updated: August 29, 2013

Darryn Bonthuys

Something wrong gentlemen? You come here prepared to read the words of a madman, and instead found a lunatic obsessed with comics, Batman and Raul Julia's M Bison performance in the 1994 Street Fighter movie? Fine! Keep your bio! In fact, now might be a good time to pray to it!

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