Watch Dogs hijacked Driver

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Driverdogs

Watch Dogs, a game people who own next-gen consoles are patiently waiting for, was meant to be a next-gen launch title – but got delayed for polish. Many believe that it has some sort of link to the established Assassin’s Creed universe, but according to Ubisoft, it actually has a little more to do with another Ubisoft franchise; Driver.

In fact, it started its life as a prototype for a Driver game, Ubisoft’s Laurent Detoc told IGN.

“Watch Dogs wasn’t started as Watch Dogs. They were working on a driving engine, working on something. We had the Driver license. This was years ago. Then we were thinking, ‘no, this is not the way we want to go with a driving game,’ so we cancelled that and restarted,” he said.

“It’s not like Watch Dogs started as Watch Dogs. The Watch Dogs project was initially another game. At some point it changed. That’s at least three years ago, and then the Watch Dogs project reused some of the work that had been done on this driving engine.”

That’s not to say it was a Driver game that got repurposed and spun in a different direction; rather that bits and pieces of a cancelled game.

“The decision was made that there was another driving game being made and this one should be an open-world game where the guy comes out of the car and does other things. Then the team decides to reshuffle itself entirely. A few other people come in, a new creative director, and then they start a new game,” he said.

“I wouldn’t say that Driver became Watch Dogs, because that’s not true. That’s not really what happens. What happens is that a game gets cancelled, and then you take pieces of that game to make a new one. We could have had another driving engine from another team in another place, and then it would have been used by the Watch Dogs team.”

The last Driver Game, Driver: San Francisco, was a rather good game that people largely ignored for some reason. Pity. Watch Dogs is out on everything next year, in the Northern Hemisphere’s Spring.

Read  Ubisoft avoids being openly political in their games because that’s “bad for business”

Last Updated: December 19, 2013

Geoffrey Tim

Editor. I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces.

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