Wii U not struggling because of its name

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ReggieWiiU

What’s in a name? Not much, if you were to ask Nintendo of America’s beefy bossman Reggie Fils-Aime. He doesn’t believe that the Wii U’s awkward naming has anything to do with the consoles failure to gain wide-spread momentum.

“The challenges we’re facing with Wii U are not issues of the name,” Fils-Aime said to Kotaku. “The issue is the lack of a steady rate of software launches to motivate the consumer to drive buzz and engagement and to highlight the wide variety of uses of the GamePad. That’s the issue.”

“The consumer understands that we have a new system. But the consumer is saying: ‘What am I going to play? And what am I going to play that’s a new and unique and compelling experience vs. what I can do today, whether it’s on the Wii or any other system?’

“And that’s why experiences like Pikmin 3, like Wonderful 101, like Zelda Wind Waker HD, with the off-TV play, experiences like Super Mario 3D World—that’s why it’s critical that we launch those, have consumers experience them in malls across the country, which we’ll be doing. It’s critical that the consumer see for themselves the range and breadth of compelling software for the system.”

I love the Wii U; I think it’s a clever little machine – but I really do feel the name is an issue, and one of the reason’s the console’s messaging just hasn’t found accord with the general populace. Many people still think that the Wii U is very expensive peripheral for the original Wii, and not an entirely new console.

Yes, there’s also the issue of the lack of games – but that’s a problem that’s largely going away. The biggest problem comes down to messaging; Nintendo just hasn’t really convinced the world that they have to have a Wii U, the way they did with the Wii.

On that note; Rayman Legends is out today – and if you have a Wii U, that’s the system to get it on.

Last Updated: August 30, 2013

Geoffrey Tim

Editor. I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces.

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