YouTuber money scandal part deux!

2 min read
31

Partdeux

Increasingly, more and more gamers are getting their gaming news and opinions from video content found on YouTube. they, many gamers contend, are real enthusiast, not PR shills interested only in money like the corrupt and crooked gaming press. It wasn’t at all long ago that this was revealed to not be quite so true; game publishers and platform holders were paying Youtubers to play their games and say nice things about their systems. Now it seems that some YouTubers are so full of themselves that they’re actually asking for profit share from indie game developers.

That’s according to Simon Roth, developer of Maia, who claims that YouTubers approached him asking for a slice of profit share. They probably posit that it’s because of their Let’s Play videos that his game is popular in the first place, and thus deserve a slice of his game’s revenue.

Roth didn’t mention any names, though replies seem to imply that Yogscast is involved in this sort of thing. It also seems that Roth is not the only indie dev approached. Vlambeer’s Rami Ismail says he’s also been asked to give up a share of his earned cash to YouTubers.

Essentially,. it seems that some prolific YouTubers are asking indie developers to pay them money to play their games. These are guys who already make a fair amount of cash on YouTube – and asking for profit share just smacks of greed. It’s scummy, presumptuous and just straight out unethical – though it’s a problem I think that’s been bred by game publishers, who do actually pay YouTubers to play their games.

Once again, I’m not painting all of YouTube with the same brush; there are guys out there doing good, insightful work. There are, however, a greedy few who’re making it hard to trust anyone. At some point, these people stop being enthusiast voices of opinion and start being advertising agencies. 

Last Updated: April 30, 2014

Geoffrey Tim

Editor. I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces.

Check Also

SDCC: Watching this first trailer for YouTube’s Origin has consequences

YouTube is showing it can compete with the likes of Netflix in making high quality sci-fi …