AMD’s new cards coming in June. Too little, too late?

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AMD’s in a financial pickle – and it’s one that they’re going to have to fight incredibly hard to get out of. While it’s not just their GPU business that’s not as healthy as it should be, the release of their next series of cards could help stem the bleeding before the company’s a miserable, shrivelled corpse. And according to industry insiders, those cards are coming in June.

We already told you that AMD would likely release its cards to coincide with Computex in June, and that – according to insiders – is exactly when you can expect them. It may be a case of too little, too late though; many PC gamers are waiting for The Witcher 3 to hit before upgrading their machines, and when that game is out, the best value for money card that’ll be out will belong to Nvidia.

If you’re willing to wait until June, here are the higher end, R9 cards you can expect to find at retail (via Kitguru) :

  • AMD Radeon R9 390/390X – Fiji Pro/Fiji XT graphics processing units featuring GCN 1.3 architecture with up to 4096 stream processors and 4096-bit interface to HBM memory. Price range: $649 and upwards.
  • AMD Radeon R9 380/380X – Grenada Pro/Grenada XT graphics processing units featuring GCN 1.2 or GCN 1.3 architecture with up to 2816 stream processors and 512-bit interface to GDDR5 memory. Price range: $249 – $299 – $329. Since “Grenada” GPU is basically a revamped “Hawaii”, it is possible that instead of making a new GPU, AMD will simply use the old one under a new moniker.
  • AMD Radeon R9 375X – Tonga XT graphics processing units featuring GCN 1.2 architecture with up to 2048 stream processors and 384-bit interface to GDDR5 memory. Price range: around $229.
  • AMD Radeon R9 375 – Tonga Pro graphics processing units featuring GCN 1.2 architecture with up to 1792 stream processors and 256-bit interface to GDDR5 memory. Price range: around $199.
  • AMD Radeon R9 370/370X – Trinidad Pro/Trinidad XT graphics processing units featuring GCN 1.3 architecture with up to 1536 stream processors and 256-bit interface to GDDR5 memory. Price range: $119 – $149.

On top of those, Fudzilla says you can expect a second Fiji-based card from Team Red; one that lumps two Fiji chips on a single board, and is intended for Virtual Reality use. AMD’s top-end card is expected to outpace Nvidia’s GTX 980, but not its ultra-enthusiast Titan card. Everything outside of the top end is built off of older, but retuned hardware. If you’re looking for the best price to performance, then it starting to look like Nvidia’s 970 may still be your best bet, even after AMD releases its cards.

AMD needs to do something though. A look at its most recent financial reports show that the company has made a sizeable US$180 million loss in the first quarter of this year – a significantly higher loss than the US$20 million in the same quarter last year.

There have been myriad rumours that the company would be bought out by Samsung – which I honestly think would be the best thing that could happen. With its diversifying markets and expendable R&D budgets, Samsung could keep AMD from tanking; a situation that would be a terrible one for gamers.

Last Updated: April 21, 2015

Geoffrey Tim

Editor. I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces.

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