Ford has just made a robotic buttock that can sweat

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Ever wondered how they actually test the functionality and comfort of a car seat? Me neither. Apparently though, it’s not something Ford entrusts to humans, but it’s one of those activities which they feel best suits the work of robots. Because they understand our butts apparently. And they’re becoming frighteningly life-like. And you thought the loss of jobs and the start of a potential war would be the biggest thing you would need to worry about with the upcoming robot apocalypse.

Back in 2017 Ford introduced a robotic butt, called Robutt, which was essentially just a cushion at the end of a robotic arm that performs CPR on car seats for days at a time to quickly re-create 10 years of wear and tear. It was an ingenious way of better understanding how the most important components of comfort in a car would last over an extended period of time without actually needing to wait for an extended period of time.

However, since it was first released, they have since discovered that there was more that needed to be done in properly simulating the wear and tear on their car seats by now making them replicating the sweating of a human buttock.

To better mimic real-life usage, like getting into your car after a workout at the gym, the Robutt now has the ability to sweat. Its cushioning is heated to 36 degrees Celsius (to approximate the human body’s temperature), and half a litre of water is fed through the fabric to replicate the effects of sweating on the average human posterior. An important factor, especially in hot conditions like South Africa were we tend to sit in our cars with a hot and sweaty butt a lot more than many of our northern hemisphere counterparts.

It’s a simple solution and one that will hopefully improve the quality of seating available on Ford cars. Exactly what new findings will help them find though remains to be seen. Alternatively, if they don’t come right – sitting on a seat for hours on end seems like a job I was made for. Where do I apply?

Last Updated: January 14, 2019