This paper-thin Bluetooth technology can harvest its own power

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This paper-thin Bluetooth technology can harvest its own power 2

Let’s face it, the world of the future is a completely interconnect one where practically everything will be able to speak to everything else through some form of Bluetooth or wireless technology. Though not if Eskom keeps on interfering and all these things require power will be useless to us when we aren’t able to charge them.

A company called Wiliot though has now gone and created a batteryless, self-powered device that can actually send Bluetooth data. Their new postage stamp-sized chip is able to harvest energy from the ambient radio frequencies around us, such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and cellular signals, and use them to power a Bluetooth-equipped ARM processor that can be connected to a variety of sensors. It’s essentially a Rogue-like mutant ability where it draws the power from other devices and utilises it for itself.

The device right now can be used to simply transmit data, but the company believes that there are many more uses for the technology where it could be embedded in traditional consumer products where it could provide a customer with easy access to its digital manual or perhaps placed in clothes where it can tell a washing machine exactly how it needs to be washed. Simple ideas, but it’s clear that the potential for the technology is far reaching and can turn almost anything into a connected device as a result. That this small device lacks any form of battery will also make it relatively inexpensive to produce further adding to its attractiveness for other manufacturers to look into.

One of the big barriers to interconnected smart devices has been the cost of the technology which requires consumers needing to spend a lot of money on all their smart technology to make dreams of a fully automated lifestyle a reality. If a device like this can drastically reduce that cost in the future, then we could just see this technology become a lot more mainstream. At least before Skynet hacks into it all and your fridge door starts beating you to death.

Last Updated: January 17, 2019

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