Dragon Age 2 Designer on Importing Saves

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I missed the Dragon Age train when it first came round, but managed to hop aboard a little earlier this year – and it ended up being one of the more enjoyable journeys I’ve had. Thanks to the game’s sometimes ambiguous morality, I made a few terrible choices that may come back to haunt me.

Speaking to NowGamer, Dragon Age 2’s lead designer Mike Laidlaw has revealed a little more about importing saves from the original, and what effects this might have on the game.

“We look at it as importing the world really. I’ve always seen Dragon Age as a franchise as about more than any one character, ” said Laidlaw. “It’s about an entire span of history and the whole world that’s affected by what happens. So that was our approach and I think the importing stays true to that in the sense that the decisions your Warden made and the person they were all affects Dragon Age II. You know, who’s in charge of Ferelden, what happened with the Dwarves, who’s running Orzammar? All of these things are reflected and accounted for in Dragon Age II.”

Morrigan’s story too, it seems, has not come to a close, despite her supposedly final chapter delivered through the (broken) Witch Hunt DLC.

“Morrigan’s story is not over even after the Witch Hunt DLC, and although I can’t go too far into it, I can say that she’s not done with this world by any stretch of the imagination,” confirmed Laidlaw.

Unfortunately, it seems like “The Fade” will make a return too. If I wanted weird trippy experiences in my RPG’s, I’d just take drugs before playing them. “in terms of how central it will be, I think there’s some very critical moments tied to the Fade but I don’t want to go into too many details.”

Laidlaw also speaks at length about how the single central character will affect the game’s narrative, leading to a much tighter story. Read the full interview, over at NowGamer.

Last Updated: October 6, 2010

Geoffrey Tim

Editor. I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces.

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