EA is the worst company in America. Again

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Sure, their business practices are a little wayward; they seem more intent with chasing the dollar than pursuing customer’s interests, but does EA really deserve to be labelled “The Worst company in America?” They’ve nabbed the dubious honour for a second year running, becoming the first company ever to “win” the title for a second time.

"Following last year’s surprise Worst Company In America victory by Electronic Arts, there was hope that the video game giant would get the message: Stop treating your customers like human piggy banks, and don’t put out so many incomplete and/or broken games with the intent of getting your customers to pay extra for what they should have received in the first place," says The Consumerist.

EA’s been accused of mistreating its customers, by putting out rushed-to-market games, nickel-and-diming through microtransactions and in-app purchases and a general lack of support for its products – but does that really compare with banks that take people’s home’s away, huge multi-national corporations that treat their workers as underpaid slaves?

“EA has become a company that releases mediocre products created by faceless teams,” says Penny Arcade’s Ben Kuchera about EA. “There is no real vision at work, no grand design. Just the idea that free-to-play games and microtransactions are the wave of the future, or at least they better be, because none of the company’s $60 boxed releases are finding much success with either critics or gamers.”

EA COO Peter Moore recently took to defending the company in a rather deflective and misguided manner, saying that the company “could do better,” while also failing to admit that EA habitually screws consumers over.

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While I’m in no way defending EA’s business practices – and consumers should never be taken advantage of – I can’t help but feel this is all just a little misplaced.

Last Updated: April 10, 2013

Geoffrey Tim

Editor. I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces.

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