The attacks on the gaming industry are getting insane

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There has been a lot of criticism of the gaming industry in the past year from how our games aren’t inclusive or diverse enough to how the industry is corrupt from the developers all the way past journalists and to the retailers even.

The main movement that has surrounded this furore is #GamerGate which has split the vocal members of the industry down the middle where people are either for the ideals of Gamergate or those who believe Gamergate is simply a misogynistic group who are trying to protect their old world ideals.

That debate will rage on for a long time still but today I saw a new article that to me just feels like that step too far.

Holly Neilson has written an article for The Guardian where she says that the gaming industry has a “uniform” that is driven by a lack of diversity.

But one thing I discovered very quickly when I started working here is that there is a uniform: it’s just that this one is the result, not of workplace rules, but of a lack of diversity. And it can be just as excluding.

The white guy in checked shirt, jeans and trainers. Possibly with a beard. It’s the joke we often make about the industry, but there is plenty of truth in the stereotype.

Basically she goes on saying that the fact that many journalists wear checked shirts, gamer tshirts and jeans is a problem that a more diverse industry would fix. Obviously, the article isn’t really about clothing, but I’m throwing 2c in anyway. Now I don’t know anything about Holly or what part of the industry she works in but I have personally been on many international trips and met journalists from all over and the idea that we all wear the same clothes is quite insulting to be honest.

On one of my trips we even had a discussion around the different styles that people wear from different countries. The Italians often arrive in suits or fancy clothing, the Greek guy looked like he just came off a farm while the English and Americans ranged from Hipster hell to grunge rockers. The ladies have ranged from dresses you expect to see in clubs to oversized jeans and frumpy tops.

Now this isn’t to say the industry isn’t weighted to the white male demographic but to constantly attack the industry in any form whatsoever has become more than a little irritating and to now imply that I need to worry about what I’m wearing is as far from changing the industry to be more inclusive.

It’s enough, Holly even stated in the article that she still dresses very femininely when she goes to the events so where is this problem really?

This is an opinion piece by the author indicated and does not represent the views of the publication or its staff.

Last Updated: May 19, 2015

Gavin Mannion

I for one welcome our future robotic overlords

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