Here’s Detroit: Become Human’s launch trailer

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Detroit

There are generally two ways that Quantic Dreams games go. They either end up being intriguing and engaging experiences, or they end up being convoluted messes, so caught up in writer David Cage’s deluded egotism.

I sincerely, sincerely hope that Detroit: Become Human isn’t one of the David Cage games where he’s so far up his own arse that the whole thing just becomes a cringeworthy mess. I personally wouldn’t trust Cage to handle delicate situations with any nuance – and from the looks of it, Detroit is stuffed full of delicate situations.

Out this week, Detroit is a game about choices, and the profound effect those choices can make.

“Enter the near-future metropolis of Detroit in 2038 – a city rejuvenated by the introduction of highly advanced androids that exist only to serve mankind. But that’s all about to change…

Step into the shoes of three distinct android characters as this brave new world teeters on the brink of chaos. Your decisions dramatically alter how the game’s intense, branching narrative plays out. With thousands of choices and dozens of endings, how will you affect the future of Detroit?”

With a branching narrative and three playable characters, Detroit definitely seems like it’s less self-absorbed than Beyond was.

With David Cage’s perpetual ramblings about emotions in games, and how he was going to very nearly singlehandedly change the way we feel things in a medium that’s all about “shooting things,” his latest bit of interactive fiction, Beyond: Two Souls was always going to be heavily scrutinised. It would never be able to please everyone. I adored Heavy Rain; it was a fresh, unique and interesting experience in a time populated by little else other than Call of Duty clones, and I’d have been happy for a similar experience with Beyond. Instead, it was a rambling, barely cohesive mess.

Last Updated: May 22, 2018

Geoffrey Tim

Editor. I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces.

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