Special Effects legend Carlo Rambaldi has died

2 min read
0

Some sad news today, as one of the pioneers in creating visual effects for the big screen, Carlos Rambaldi has passed away from illness, aged 86. Rambaldi was instrumental in his work on the big screen, bringing numerous movie monsters to life.Starting his career with director Giacomo Gentilomo, Rambaldi helped create a dragon in the first film that he worked on, Sigfredo. From there, he went on to work in numerous other films, such as Planet of the Vampires, Twitch of the death nerve and The Witch in Love amongst others, before hopping across the US of A to bring King Kong to life for Dino De Laurentiis, a project that earned him an Oscar in the process.

From there, Rambaldi used his talents to make films such as Dune, Conan the Destroyer, Silver Bullet and others that much more authentic, in an age where CGI was yet to be implemented fully in films, before he worked on his masterpiece, the Xenomorph creature designed by HR Giger, in Ridley Scott’s Alien.

From there, Rambaldi also worked with Steven Spielberg, on Close encounters of the third kind, as well as the iconic E.T The Extraterrestrial. The last film that Rambaldi worked on, was a project directed by his own son, A friend from outer space, in 2006, as he relied solely on practical effects for it.

“E.T. cost a million dollars and we created it in three months,” Rambaldi told La Repubblica back then. “If we wanted to do the same thing with computers it would take at least 200 people a minimum of five months!”

“Carlo Rambaldi was E.T.’s Geppetto,” Steven Spielberg said on the weekend of his passing. “All of us who marvelled and wondered at his craft and artistry are deeply saddened at his passing.”

Last Updated: August 13, 2012

Darryn Bonthuys

Word-slinger at Critical Hit. Inventor of the macho Swiss gym chocolate known as Testoblerone. That's...that's about it really.

Check Also

Stan Lee’s company responds to Bill Maher’s bad jibes at the departed comic book legend

The ambassador of comic books and movie cameos was as lovable as could be, even in the tw…